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The Real Truth About Being A Golf Pro

Your dream job may be putting your natural skills to work, and if you're into golf, you surely know about the money that certain famous names can rake in by becoming a golf pro. Out on the green under the bright, warm sunlight, slowly preparing you for that perfect swing that'll send the ball straight down the midway to the cup. Doesn't that sound like the perfect career? Maybe you're the type that wants to teach the wealthy what you know, helping them to perfect their game while you earn an income from their lack of talent. You could just be someone who wants to become one of those big names, fame and fortune calling you and teasing you as you work some boring job in a routine of daily grind. There's far more than just sun, grass and talent involved in becoming a golf pro. In today's society, everything has become a competition for bigger, better and more.

Even the sports industry has turned into a sink-or-swim job market, where you need more than pure talent to rise ahead. Colleges and academies offer courses and education for golfing careers, which shows that just being able to play isn't enough to land your dream career. Businesses who hire professionals to work in their golf complexes want versatile employees who know how to hit the ball as well as manage a team of employees and run a profitable industry. You need to have the right type of beginning skills to become a golf pro. If you're determined to pursue this type of career, it's a good idea to get an inside look at the job profile to see if a golf pro is the right choice for you.

Sure, the golf industry has a lot of money to spare. At $62 billion, there's more than enough wealth in golfing to go around, but there's also around 28,000 people working as golf pros or apprentices. Someone who wants to be at the top of their league, earning the title of golf pro to get a chunk of that cash, will need to put in long hours, have a good golf score and business skills, as well as a proper education to back them up. You have to be on top of your game and be able to play well to work towards a pro golf career. Most educational facilities only accept students if they have a handicap of 12. There's a PGA Professional Golf Management program you can enroll in, or you can become a student at one of the many academies and colleges offering similar golf pro degrees. You'll need to have teaching skills as well, because a golf pro can sometimes be called upon to pass on what he knows to others and learning to teach properly is important. The highest dropout rate in golf programs occurs in the first year, when many students realize that there's more than fun and games involved in earning their degree. A golf pro can be called on to handle many aspects in the golf industry and business skills are what propel you up that ladder of success. Be prepared to end up in a position where you didn't expect to be.

Many golf pros end up teaching and coaching more than they do perfecting their swing, or managing golf complexes from the food industry located inside to the paperwork and planning of changes to the course. Essentially, you have to look towards being someone who helps others with their game instead of working on your own. Interpersonal skills are a must and you need to be a strong people person, as you'll be working with many different individuals. Being a golf pro isn't about being the best you can be, it's definitely about making sure others progress to being better than they are.


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